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Skeet

Skeet shooting is a recreational and competitive activity where participants, using shotguns, attempt to break clay discs (also called clay pigeons) automatically flung into the air from two fixed stations at high speed from a variety of angles.

Skeet is one of the three major types of competitive shotgun target shooting sports (the others are trap shooting and sporting clays).

We have two skeet fields available at Freeland Conservation Club.  Our main skeet range has been updated with new high capacity Lincoln trap machines.  These 400 target capacity machines are installed and have been operational since the end of April, 2013.  We are very happy with them and are also using our wireless controller.  We are open for Skeet!

The event is in part meant to simulate the action of bird hunting. The shooter shoots from seven positions on a semicircle with a radius of 21 yards (19 m), and an eighth position halfway between stations 1 and 7. There are two houses that hold devices known as "traps" that launch the targets, one at each corner of the semicircle. The traps launch the targets to a point 15 feet above ground and 18 feet outside of station 8. One trap launches targets from 10 feet above the ground ("high" house) and the other launches it from 3 feet above ground ("low" house).

At stations 1 and 2 the shooter shoots at single targets launched from the high house and then the low house, then shoots a double where the two targets are launched simultaneously but shooting the high house target first. At stations 3, 4, and 5 the shooter shoots at single targets launched from the high house and then the low house. At stations 6 and 7 the shooter shoots at single targets launched from the high house and then the low house, then shoots a double, shooting the low house target first then the high house target. At station 8 the shooter shoots one high target and one low target.

The shooter must then re-shoot his first missed target or, if no targets are missed, must shoot his 25th shell at the low house station 8. This 25th shot was once referred to as the shooter's option, as he was able to take it where he preferred. Now, to speed up rounds in competition, the shooter must shoot the low 8 twice for a perfect score.